Research papers

EA Taxonomy term (Content) - Row by date

Christopher J Hall, Rachel Wicaksono, Shu Liu, Yuan Qian and Xu Xiaoqing

This report describes an online course, Changing Englishes, designed to raise awareness of the ‘plurilithic’ nature of English, enable teachers to value the diversity of individually and locally appropriate learning objectives and outcomes, and promote the development and sharing of pedagogical strategies which respond to the global realities of the language. 

Florentina Taylor, Vera Busse, Lubina Gagova, Emma Marsden and Barbara Roosken
This paper explores the relationship between identity perceptions, declared learner achievement and teacher perceptions. The importance of providing a personally relevant learning and teaching environment is discussed and the report provides several practical suggestions of how this can be achieved.

Graham Hall and Guy Cook
In this research paper Graham Hall and Guy Cook explore teacher attitudes to own-language use in the classroom. They conducted a global survey and interviews with practising teachers. They found evidence of widespread own-language use within ELT, and suggest that teachers’ attitudes towards own-language use, and their classroom practices, are more complex than usually acknowledged.

Jeannette Littlemore, Fiona MacArthur, Alan Cienki and Joseph Holloway
In recent years there has been a significant increase in the number of international students studying at British universities. This paper reports on a study of oral interactions between lecturers and international students studying at a British university and a Spanish one.

Simon Borg, School of Education, University of Leed and Saleh Al-Busaidi, The Language Centre, Sultan Qaboos University

Learner autonomy has been the subject of many studies but there have been fewer studies of what learner autonomy means to teachers. This study, conducted in Oman, reports on teacher beliefs and reported practices regarding learner autonomy. Data were collected through questionnaires and interviews.

Elizabeth J. Erling, Philip Seargeant, Mike Solly, Qumrul Hasan Chowdhury and Sayeedur Rahman
There is only limited evidence showing a relationship between the English language and development. This ethnographic survey conducted in 2 rural communities in Bangladesh investigates the needs and aspirations of the local community in order to better understand how English language education could contribute to development.

Helen Emery
This research paper reports on a global study of primary English teachers’ qualifications, training, teaching experience and career development. Nearly 2,500 teachers completed an electronic survey. In-depth face-to-face interviews were also conducted. The study raises issues which it is felt should be taken up by ELT providers but teachers were overwhelmingly positive in their attitudes towards the profession.

Jelena Mihaljević Djigunović

Children are starting to learn English at increasingly younger ages. This paper, which was part of the ELLIE project, researches the phenomenon through a country case study, with data collected from Croatian young learners whose progress was followed over three years.

Clare Wardman
This research paper reports on a study conducted in the north of England into the provision of support for children who speak English as an Additional Language (EAL). She places her work into the international context and develops five recommendations for action. These include training new teachers on EAL issues and enhancing the dialogue between schools who have similar requirements in order to limit wasting time and money.

Will Baker
This research paper, by Will Baker, reports on a study conducted in Thailand into the development  of an online course in intercultural awareness and communication. The findings of this study demonstrate generally positive responses both to the course contents and the online delivery.  Both e-learning and the cultural dimension of ELT have grown in prominence.

Huw Jarvis
This paper reports on a study conducted by Huw Jarvis into the perceptions and practices of Thai and Emirati university students in the use of computer-based materials beyond the classroom.  It explores how these students use technology to support their English language learning and offers recommendations for institutions that provide self-access centres. The paper concludes that the term mobile assisted language use may better describe how learners use technology.

Alan Waters and Maria Luz C. Vilches
Effective in-service training (INSET) is vital for both teacher development and curriculum reform. This paper contains a number of practical guidelines on how to maximise the potential for 'best practice' in ELT INSET. The research was conducted in the Philippines where Waters and Vilches gathered data from both INSET suppliers and end-users. The resulting picture of 'best practice' will be of value to others working in similar situations elsewhere.<--break-> 

Pages

EA Taxonomy term (Content) - Page

Clare Wardman
This research paper reports on a study conducted in the north of England into the provision of support for children who speak English as an Additional Language (EAL). She places her work into the international context and develops five recommendations for action. These include training new teachers on EAL issues and enhancing the dialogue between schools who have similar requirements in order to limit wasting time and money.

Stephen Bax, University of Bedfordshire

This paper investigates readers’ mental processes when taking reading tests. It will be of particular interest to researchers and practitioners who are interested in the testing of reading skills.

Lixian Jin, Jing Zhou, Xiaoyan Hu, Xiaolan Yang, Ke Sun, Mengdi Zhao and Fan Yang
 
This paper investigates attitudes and perceived experiences of English learning by Chinese kindergarten children, 4-6 years old, and their parents through the use of questionnaires and innovative methods: metaphor analysis and narrative analysis.
Jane Evison and Mary Bailey
 
In this study we listened to what school subject teachers from Nigeria, Kenya and Malaysia, teaching in the medium of English, had to say about their experiences of studying online with a UK university. 

Graham Hall and Guy Cook

This paper explores the English language needs of young adults in the European Union. Drawing on a Europe-wide survey of teachers and learners, and face-to-face interviews in three European contexts, it finds that teachers and students share generally similar attitudes towards English.

Barbara Skinner and Helen Hou

How do university supervisors and host teachers evaluate the teaching practice performance of non-native English language teacher trainees? This paper explores this question in relation to four overseas TESOL trainees who study on a vocational Masters in TESOL at a UK university and carry out their teaching practice in Hungarian schools.

Naeema Hann, Ivor Timmis, Ali Ata Alkhaldi, Beverley Davies, Carlos Rico Troncoso, Yong Yi

What benefits can English language skills bring to a person’s life, both professional and personal? This paper addresses this question in relation to data collected from four contrasting contexts.

Simon Borg, Marilisa Birello, Isabel Civera and Theresa Zanatta

What impact does pre-service English language teacher education have on trainees’ beliefs? This paper explores this question through an innovative visual methods study at the University of Barcelona and will interest anyone involved in pre-service teacher education.

This study explores how metacognitive knowledge and strategy training may support and enhance language proficiency across cultures.

Christina Gkonou and Sarah Mercer

This paper explores the nature and role of emotional and social competences as key components of effective classroom practice.

 

This study provides an investigation of the processes and practices involved in conducting action research on the use of ICT and new technologies in the classroom as experienced by 12 teachers located across different international contexts, from Europe, the Middle East and Asia.

Will Baker
This research paper, by Will Baker, reports on a study conducted in Thailand into the development  of an online course in intercultural awareness and communication. The findings of this study demonstrate generally positive responses both to the course contents and the online delivery.  Both e-learning and the cultural dimension of ELT have grown in prominence.

Pages

Subscribe to Research papers