Research papers

EA Taxonomy term (Content) - Row by date

Elizabeth J Erling, Philip Seargeant, Mike Solly, Qumrul Hasan Chowdhury, Sayeedur Rahman

This report investigates the relationship between English language learning and economic development among workers from rural Bangladesh who emigrated to the Middle East in search of employment. It provides first-hand accounts of language and other needs of those living and working in contexts of this sort, and provides valuable insights which can feed into the design and implementation of English language education policies and programmes.

Graham Hall and Guy Cook

This paper explores the English language needs of young adults in the European Union. Drawing on a Europe-wide survey of teachers and learners, and face-to-face interviews in three European contexts, it finds that teachers and students share generally similar attitudes towards English.

Agnes Kukulska-Hulme, Lucy Norris and Jim Donohue

This guide is for anyone interested in teaching and learning languages, and thinking about teaching practices. It sets out a philosophy and proposes a frame of reference to aid teacher-thinking when designing mobile language learning in and beyond the classroom, informed by research conducted with teachers and learners in ESOL and EAP contexts.

Caroline Linse, Stephen van Vlack and Oscar Bladas

This paper highlights a little-discussed global issue: the importance of school-home communications in supporting effective language learning by young learners. It draws on eight contrasting contexts: France, Mexico, Spain, Korea, Namibia, Japan, the Philippines and Bangladesh.

Barbara Skinner and Helen Hou

How do university supervisors and host teachers evaluate the teaching practice performance of non-native English language teacher trainees? This paper explores this question in relation to four overseas TESOL trainees who study on a vocational Masters in TESOL at a UK university and carry out their teaching practice in Hungarian schools.

Lixian Jin, Changsheng Jiang, Jie Zhang, Yuan Yuan, Xiaohua and Qun Xie

This paper investigates attitudes, perceptions and motivations of Chinese primary school pupils and their parents towards the learning of English through both quantitative and qualitative methods, particularly using elicited metaphor analysis. The findings offer insights into these English learners and their parents, with wider implications for English teaching practice for young learners.

Simon Borg, Marilisa Birello, Isabel Civera and Theresa Zanatta

What impact does pre-service English language teacher education have on trainees’ beliefs? This paper explores this question through an innovative visual methods study at the University of Barcelona and will interest anyone involved in pre-service teacher education.

Naeema Hann, Ivor Timmis, Ali Ata Alkhaldi, Beverley Davies, Carlos Rico Troncoso, Yong Yi

What benefits can English language skills bring to a person’s life, both professional and personal? This paper addresses this question in relation to data collected from four contrasting contexts.

Martin Lamb and Martin Wedell

What makes teachers motivating? This paper reviews the literature on motivational teaching and presents findings on the nature of inspiring teaching in two countries, looking at how learners perceive the qualities of teachers who inspire them.

Martin Wedell and Martin Lamb
 
This paper investigates the nature of inspiring English language teaching, reporting on observations of English language classes in China and Indonesia.
Anne Burns, Muna Morris-Adams, Sue Garton and Fiona Copland, Aston University, Birmingham
 
This paper addresses important issues relating to the transition from primary to secondary school: how learners and teachers of English experience that change and how schools can help.

Stephen Bax, University of Bedfordshire

This paper investigates readers’ mental processes when taking reading tests. It will be of particular interest to researchers and practitioners who are interested in the testing of reading skills.

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EA Taxonomy term (Content) - Page

Fiona Copland, Monika Davis, Sue Garton and Steve Mann

This report presents findings from a research project which investigates NEST schemes, how they operate and the experiences of the native English speaker teachers (NESTs) and local English teachers (LETs) taking part. The paper provides useful recommendations for how NESTs and LETs can be best supported to make the most out of their collaborations.

Ying Zheng, Yanyan Zhang and Youyang Yan
 
This paper explores the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) in relation to its current profile and use in China, and considers its possible application in assessing the writing of English by Chinese university students.
Anne Burns, Muna Morris-Adams, Sue Garton and Fiona Copland, Aston University, Birmingham
 
This paper addresses important issues relating to the transition from primary to secondary school: how learners and teachers of English experience that change and how schools can help.

This research study used eyetracking methods to investigate how adults and young learners process readings which combine text, audio and pictures.

Simon Borg, School of Education, University of Leed and Saleh Al-Busaidi, The Language Centre, Sultan Qaboos University

Learner autonomy has been the subject of many studies but there have been fewer studies of what learner autonomy means to teachers. This study, conducted in Oman, reports on teacher beliefs and reported practices regarding learner autonomy. Data were collected through questionnaires and interviews.

Fiona Copland, Monika Davis, Sue Garton and Steve Mann

These training materials have been created as part of a larger, British Council funded project: 'Investigating NEST schemes around the world: supporting NEST/LET collaborative practices'. They have been designed with the aim of developing cooperation and understanding between local English teachers (LETs) and native English speaker teachers (NESTs).

Agnes Kukulska-Hulme, Lucy Norris and Jim Donohue

This guide is for anyone interested in teaching and learning languages, and thinking about teaching practices. It sets out a philosophy and proposes a frame of reference to aid teacher-thinking when designing mobile language learning in and beyond the classroom, informed by research conducted with teachers and learners in ESOL and EAP contexts.

Lixian Jin, Changsheng Jiang, Jie Zhang, Yuan Yuan, Xiaohua and Qun Xie

This paper investigates attitudes, perceptions and motivations of Chinese primary school pupils and their parents towards the learning of English through both quantitative and qualitative methods, particularly using elicited metaphor analysis. The findings offer insights into these English learners and their parents, with wider implications for English teaching practice for young learners.

Graham Hall and Guy Cook
In this research paper Graham Hall and Guy Cook explore teacher attitudes to own-language use in the classroom. They conducted a global survey and interviews with practising teachers. They found evidence of widespread own-language use within ELT, and suggest that teachers’ attitudes towards own-language use, and their classroom practices, are more complex than usually acknowledged.

Caroline Linse, Stephen van Vlack and Oscar Bladas

This paper highlights a little-discussed global issue: the importance of school-home communications in supporting effective language learning by young learners. It draws on eight contrasting contexts: France, Mexico, Spain, Korea, Namibia, Japan, the Philippines and Bangladesh.

L. Jin, K. Smith, A. Yahya, A. Chan, M. Choong, A. Lee, V. Ng, P. Poh-Wong, D. Young
Learners with dyslexia have difficulties in reading and writing. In Singapore there are about 20,000 primary and secondary school learners with dyslexia. This paper presents research findings on the perceptions and feelings of primary school learners with dyslexia in Singapore regarding their learning of school subjects through English, together with how they use strategies to overcome some difficulties.

Martin Wedell and Martin Lamb
 
This paper investigates the nature of inspiring English language teaching, reporting on observations of English language classes in China and Indonesia.

Pages

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