Milestone publications

EA Taxonomy term (Content) - Row by date

Originally published in 1987, this book aimed to address teachers’ needs according to context.

This book, from 1986, provides a snapshot of developments in ESP teaching at university level during the 1970s and early 1980s.

This is, of course, as much a key topic in the UK as it was in 1985 when this book was originally published.

Very different to the other ELT documents, this volume focuses on the work of a single institution: the Modern Language Centre at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE).

This document, from 1983, offers a selection of project case studies and commentaries from various African contexts.

 

This is a delightful read, which attempts to provide an introduction to latest thinking in 1982 on a wide range of humanistic topics.

Published in 1981, this slim volume is concerned with helping teachers to develop the commitment to and capacity for professional development.

Dating from 1980, this book was written in response to a major study by the International Evaluation Association of achievement by education syllabuses worldwide in six key school subjects, including English.

This volume dates from 1979 and is a gem for anyone interested in the early days of university level ELT qualifications, especially in the UK.

 

This publication, from 1978, provides a useful introduction to pioneer approaches to self-directed learning and individualisation in ELT at the time.

This concise volume from 1978 is pre-‘World Englishes’ and before the acceptance of Kachru’s model of the inner, outer and expanding circles of English language use.

Pages

EA Taxonomy term (Content) - Page

This 1978 publication is a report of a small-scale research project into language learning by adult learners. This was a relatively early attempt to ask learners about the ‘strategies and techniques’ that they use to learn a language, and the author, GD Pickett, who was at the time Deputy Director of the British Council’s English Teaching Information Centre, states that his intention was for the project to be ‘a starting off point’ which could encourage further research in this area.

The purpose of this magazine-style 1999 publication was to ‘identify key trends and suggest opportunities for British ELT’ in the expansion of the internet.

Edited for the ELT Documents series by Christopher Brumfit and published in 1986, this book complements an earlier volume on General English Syllabus Design, looking at the implementation of communicative syllabuses.

This publication contains papers discussed at a British Association of Applied Linguistics (BAAL) seminar at the University of Edinburgh in September 1977.

This unique, blow-by-blow account of the 11-day 1950 conference records not only the presentations Professor EV Gatenby, Linguistic Adviser to the British Council, made at Mahableshwar, but also the follow-up discussion sessions.

This 1981 volume, a collection of papers from a colloquium organised in Paris two years earlier, provides various practical insights into the development of listening skills.

In this 1980 book, contributors involved in a seven year old University of Malaya English for Special Purposes project (UMESPP) describe various aspects of the project, which was devoted particularly to the development of academic reading abilities.

This 1979 issue of ELT Documents focuses on uses of radio and television in language learning.

This 1983 collection examines possible uses of video for language teaching, at the time this being still a recent innovation and a relatively unexplored area.

This 1964 booklet gives a summary of the main points in each film in the View and Teach series (produced by the BBC in association with the British Council) with suggestions for discussion by teachers after they have seen the films.

This short 1996 booklet, edited by Jenny Pugsley and Geraldine Kershaw, aimed to evaluate, in an informal way, the ELT work of the British Council in central and eastern Europe, 1989–95, during the transition from Communism. The British Council was able, with new UK government funding, to step up its English language teaching and teacher training in the region, meeting rapidly growing demand from the new democracies.

Pages

Subscribe to Milestone publications