Milestone publications

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The papers in this 1988 volume emerged from the International Conference on English for Specific Purposes, Colombo, Sri Lanka, 1–5 April 1985. An overall conference theme was how to create links between English teaching and the world of work.

This 1978 publication focuses on English for academic purposes (EAP) also referred to at the time as English for educational purposes, and comprises seven chapters. Hawkey’s Introduction notes ‘the significant agreement in all the papers on the importance of designing courses to train specific and relevant study as well as purely communication skills’.

This report, which includes papers by John Munby, Henry Widdowson and Tom Jupp, was compiled following an international ESP seminar organised in Bogotá, Colombia, in April 1977. The Editorial notes that, while ESP was seen as relatively new, it was also known to be an ‘extension and development of insights’, rather than a radically different methodology, and also involved a variety of approaches, not a ‘harmonised body of doctrine’.

This frequently cited 1987 publication focuses on textbooks designed for use by English language learners, and dictionaries. A range of authors explore different theoretical and applied aspects of textbook production and evaluation. They discuss teaching materials from various perspectives, including those of learners, teachers, course designers, editors, reviewers and teacher trainers.

This 1985 collection in the ELT Documents series provides multiple insights for the successful teaching of dictionary use in the language classroom.

This 1990 collection of papers looks at contexts of language teaching from educational and cultural perspectives, starting from the premise that language teaching is not ‘value free or transparent’.

The editors of this 1984 volume in the ELT Documents series describe English for Specific Purposes (ESP) and communication studies (viewed as the teaching of writing and speaking skills to those with English as a first language) as ‘two halves of a single profession’.

This pamphlet conveys an optimistic view of the expanding role of the English language worldwide, and a view of English language teaching (ELT) as no longer being the ‘prerogative of English-speaking countries’ alone. The publication is partly a call to action, and partly a description of the British Council’s work in ELT at the time.

This title, published in 1967, was intended to be the first in a series of booklets designed to be of practical help to teachers of English as a second language, especially in West Africa. The booklet provides a clear overview of the methodological orthodoxy of the time, situational language teaching.

This January 1955 issue of a magazine published in New Delhi is a revealing window on English language teaching relationships the British Council had formed with post-Independence India.

This practical 1992 booklet, the first in a series, considers ways in which institutions and staff, as well as learners, need to be prepared for self-access learning.

This unique, blow-by-blow account of the 11-day 1950 conference records not only the presentations Professor EV Gatenby, Linguistic Adviser to the British Council, made at Mahableshwar, but also the follow-up discussion sessions.

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This brief report was written following a fact-finding visit to the Soviet Union in 1962 by a delegation of British education specialists. The visit took place during a determined, centralised drive to improve language teaching.

This 1977 booklet from the ELT Documents series contains four main chapters and a postscript which introduce communicative techniques, still at that time in an early stage of development, to a wider audience.

This collection of papers emerging from the 1983 TESOL Convention in Toronto examines the role of general syllabuses in state education, at that time a relatively neglected area in comparison with ESP syllabuses. Authors of papers were invited to address three key aspects: the relationship between syllabus and learner; the design of syllabuses; and how a syllabus should be evaluated.

This is a delightful read, which attempts to provide an introduction to latest thinking in 1982 on a wide range of humanistic topics.

This 1977 publication supplements the Index to Twenty-Five Years of English Language Teaching, which covered the years from the launch of the journal in 1946 to 1971. This follow-up volume contains 14 index sections, covering the same subject areas as the first volume, from spoken English to language learning, plus an author index.

This publication, from 1978, provides a useful introduction to pioneer approaches to self-directed learning and individualisation in ELT at the time.

This 1988 publication consists of papers presented at the 1987 SELMOUS conference in Durham for EAP practitioners.

This book is based on papers and discussions at a Lancaster University symposium in October 1980 where seven applied linguists met to discuss problems in language testing. In the Introduction, the book’s editor Charles Alderson refers to the discomfort felt by many language teaching practitioners faced with the subject of ‘testing’, given the predominance of statistical analysis in the field.

This book was produced following the Hornby workshop on language improvement for teachers in Senegal in 2009.

Very different to the other ELT documents, this volume focuses on the work of a single institution: the Modern Language Centre at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE).

Originally published in 1987, this book aimed to address teachers’ needs according to context.

This document, from 1983, offers a selection of project case studies and commentaries from various African contexts.

 

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