When the Government of Southern Sudan decided to use English as one of its official languages, it was faced with a major obstacle problem - most of their employees did not speak English.

Client, stakeholders, partners

  • Government of Southern Sudan Ministry of Constitutional Development
  • Judiciary of Southern Sudan
  • United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
  • Christian Aid

Focus

English language skills for judges and lawyers

The project

When the Government of Southern Sudan decided to use English as one of its official languages, it was faced with a major obstacle problem - most of their employees did not speak English. Their legal counsels and judges work with people through English, so rapid acquisition of the language was necessary to allow them to serve the citizens of Southern Sudan.

The Ministry of Legal and Constitutional Development (MoLACD), partnered by UNDP, Christian Aid, and the British Council, decided to send 40 students for 6 months of immersion training at the British Council in Nairobi.

Alongside the language training, the British Council also organised visits to legal institutions in Kenya, such as the Attorney General's Office and the Law Faculty of Nairobi University, so that participants could see how parallel institutions operated in another country.

The programme was a great success. The Judiciary of Sudan quickly followed up by sending 40 of its judges to follow the same programme, and the MoLACD sent a further 80 students. The training was delivered by the British Council's teaching Centres in both Dar es Salaam and Nairobi. 

What the stakeholders say 

I'd like to register the appreciation, the gratitude and the happiness of those of us of in Judiciary of Southern Sudan to British Council for having made possible this opportunity to enhance our capacities. This is the beginning that we could not make alone, we can now make it because they supported us through training, advice and programming. A lot has been offered to the judiciary to make the 6 months possible.... to make the Judiciary of Southern Sudan an effective institution for the delivery of Justice. We need English Language as much as we need to know more about human rights law. We need English language as much as we need to perfect professional functions in the courts.
Chief Registrar of the Judiciary of Southern Sudan, Justice Reuben Madol

My English studies at the British Council in Nairobi will help me a lot in my career as a judge. We were back in Sudan last July. I went to my place of work and there nobody knew Arabic so I changed to working in English. [It} became easy for me to work with police who work in English. I understood everything which was written in English in the case books.
Makalele Alaka, Judge, Judiciary of Southern Sudan

 

0
ELT Projects Country: