Seminar recordings

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In this original and stimulating talk, Luke Meddings explains how you can find highly creative and unusual stimuli in everyday situations, that can be brought to class and used as teaching material.

Huw Jarvis takes English language teachers on the journey from the origins of computer assisted language learning in English Language Teaching to the modern world of English usage and mobile phones, and discusses what implications this has on English language learning and teaching today.

This talk by Dr Richard Smith provides an informative chronology of ELT developments which counteracts some common myths and raises issues for critical reflection. June 2012, Cardiff.

Michael Carrier talks about the work of TIRF (The International Research Foundation for English Language Education). June 2012, London.

Kathleen M. Bailey's session approaches the topic of learner autonomy in the contexts of conversations in the target language. June 2012, London.

Edward de Chazal and Sam McCarter give a brief overview of English for Academic Purposes (EAP) and discuss the content and preparation of an EAP syllabus. May 2012, Manchester.

Simon Andrewes talks about English as a lingua franca, where English is used as a means of communication for work or study and where native speakers may, at best, be marginally involved. May 2012, Manchester. 

In this practical technology-focused seminar, Amy Lightfoot explores opportunities for learning English by using mobile phones both in and out of the classroom.

Michael Carrier talks about how handheld and mobile learning technology extends the range of the teacher by extending learning beyond the physical lesson in the physical classroom. May 2012, London.

Sally Farley debunks several myths about dyslexia and shows how, through the right teaching strategies, dyslexic learners can become successful language learners. May 2012, Liverpool.

Hilary Nesi, Professor in English language at Coventry University, discusses the written genres university students are required to produce in different disciplines and at different levels of study. May 2012, Liverpool.

Luke Meddings answers questions from the audience about his dogme lesson. April 2012, Exeter.

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'Why was that funny?'. Humour is inextricably part of language and culture, and therefore understanding humour in English is a vital communication competence for all language learners to develop. This talk focuses on the challenges that international students face when dealing with humour.

These excerpts were recorded at George Pickering's British Council Seminar held in London in spring 2009.

This workshop presents a genre/corpus informed EAP writing programme for MA students. Following a brief overview of the theoretical and practical bases of the writing development programme Chris Tribble and Ursula Wingate share examples of the teaching materials they are using. March 2012, London.

Edward de Chazal explains the challenges that EAP (English for Academic Purposes) learners face, and what teaching staff and lecturers need to do to make the task more manageable for them.

British Council Seminars' first live lesson was taught by Luke Meddings. Watch footage of the 'dogme' lesson as well as a recording of the follow up question and answer session.  November 2011, London.

In this seminar, Gavin Dudeney gives a short history of the use of technology in education, followed by how the use of mobile devices, such as smart phones and tablets, can be used for English language learning.

What makes your students want to come to your class? This seminar, with Ken Wilson, outlines ten ways to create an atmosphere that makes them want to do just that.

These excerpts were recorded at Mario Rinvolucri's British Council Seminar held in London in 2009.

Phil Bird and Mike Harrison talk about online continuing professional development opportunities. Spring 2011.

Do you conduct your English classes entirely in English, or do you use the learners’ own language in the classroom as well? Are you wondering how other teachers around the world use L1 and L2 in their teaching? This stimulating seminar puts the spotlight once more on the important subject of L1 versus L2 usage in the ELT classroom.

Sheila Thorn explains why the types of listening comprehension activities typically done in class are not really helping our students to listen and shares some alternative advice for improving learners' listening skills.

Katy Davies and Laura Patsko present practical ideas for teaching pronunciation and listening in multilingual classes, based on their teaching experiences in Dubai and London. June 2014, London.

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