Understanding the teaching context

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The webinar explores the reasons behind the failure to implement learner-centred approaches in developing world contexts. Attempts to promote a balanced approach to pedagogy through a teacher education project in Burma are showcased.

Diana Lea, Editor of the Oxford Learner’s Dictionary of Academic English, shows how the award-winning Dictionary of Academic English can support learners in reading academic texts and in using core academic vocabulary accurately and appropriately in their writing.

This book presents an up-to-date panorama in Spanish of the teaching of English in state schools in Venezuela. It is aimed primarily at EFL teachers and researchers, as well as education authorities who design and implement language policy. The book is the result of an extensive research project carried out throughout the country by groups of researchers from ten local universities, under the coordination of the British Council in Venezuela.

In this seminar, Alan Maley, Marisa Constantinides, Phuong Lee, Nik Peachey and Malu Sciamarelli discuss activities and ideas for introducing creativity into the classroom. The event took place in London in June 2015 and celebrated the launch of a new British Council publication, 'Creativity in the English language classroom'.

The British Council and The Bell Foundation sponsored a continuing professional development conference for ESOL tutors, teachers and practitioners working in prison settings, as well as those involved in managing or leading provision of offender education.

This workshop explores what we might do to promote new ideas in language learning. Teachers and leaders were invited to join an international event on how to innovate in their contexts, looking at six UK and international case studies from across different fields: immersive learning, learner autonomy, technology and gaming.
 

With the aim to support policy and programme development, this research provides an in-depth, holistic assessment of English language learning in each of seven Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico and Peru.

This webinar focuses on helping teachers, rather than learners, with developing their own creative thinking skills so that they, in turn can do a great job with their learners. There are useful ideas for teacher educators and teachers.

Drawing on findings from a mixed methods research project investigating global practices in teaching English to young learners, this webinar identifies key factors affecting the implementation of primary school English.

Dyslexic language learners have been long neglected in the field of language teaching despite the fact they constitute about ten percent of the student population. This webinar shares practical ideas from the award-winning DysTEFL project.

Katie Quartano and Paul Shaw's practical talk shows how Disabled Access Friendly’s award-winning resources can help teachers explore mobility disability issues, develop students’ social conscience, make lessons meaningful, and encourage critical thinking.

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Given the breadth of learning needs in any classroom, how can schools best develop policies and practice to respond to this diversity? This webinar demonstrates how to develop a whole school approach to SEN, from policy to practice.

Are you challenging your students enough to learn English? How do you know if tangible learning is taking place in your English language classroom? Jim Scrivener explores these questions in this stimulating talk and suggests a number of simple, practical extension activities to include in lessons that will demand more from students and stretch them to their full potential.

This handbook has one simple purpose. That is, to provide some practical suggestions for language teachers. It may be that you are thinking about setting up an association or that you have already started an association and would like more ideas on certain aspects. The suggestions which are presented here are all based on the practical experience of teachers in many parts of the world.

Diana Lea, Editor of the Oxford Learner’s Dictionary of Academic English, shows how the award-winning Dictionary of Academic English can support learners in reading academic texts and in using core academic vocabulary accurately and appropriately in their writing.

Gavin Dudeney considers the question 'What is digital literacy?' and looks at the implications for teachers and learners. October 2011, Bournemouth.

Katie Quartano and Paul Shaw's practical talk shows how Disabled Access Friendly’s award-winning resources can help teachers explore mobility disability issues, develop students’ social conscience, make lessons meaningful, and encourage critical thinking.

Miguel Á. Muñoz presents scientific research on the cognitive costs and benefits of learning a foreign language. June 2014, Cardiff.

Global demand for English is continuing to grow. Governments increasingly recognise the importance of English to their economies and societies, and individuals see English as a tool that can help them to fulfil their personal aspirations. However, there are complex issues and challenges associated with this scenario.

Victoria Boobyer talks about some practical ideas for activities using e-books in different contexts. September 2013, London.

Olwyn Alexander and Sue Argent show how EAP is different from ELT by comparing how the two approaches would deal with the same topic using different texts and tasks. November 2011, Glasgow.

Increasingly around the world children are engaging in Early Childhood Education and Care (aged 0-7) before entering primary school. At the same time, there is an increase in the extent to which non English-speaking children are taught English through educational provision. This volume brings these two issues together by offering both evidence-based global reviews and more localised research-oriented reports on current issues in teaching children English through ECEC internationally.

This webinar suggests how tutors can help international students who are entering Higher Education, to develop their academic writing skills, by focusing on reader expectation and on academic requirements and principles.

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