Understanding how teachers learn

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Edited by Julian Edge and Steve Mann

This publication will interest and stimulate anyone who is involved in planning and providing education and training for teachers of English before they take up their positions in educational institutions. It brings together, in fourteen papers, a wealth of innovative, practical experiences and ideas from differing contexts across the world. We hope that it will provide a catalyst for new discussions and approaches in pre-service education, for the benefit of future teachers and their learners.

Edited by Ben Gray & Mark Krzanowski

An edited collection of the papers presented at the ELT Conference with the same title in Khartoum, Sudan, March 2010. The conference highlighted the fact that demand from both the public and private sectors for graduates with good English skills is now at an unprecedented level and that the current provision of ELT at university level is in urgent need of reform. The papers focused on the key issues regarding ELT – namely curriculum reform, teacher training, language testing, using new technologies and engaging the private sector.

A selection of papers presented at IATEFL 2010 by British Council staff. Find a range of articles on various themes such as educational change, the development of teacher trainers, the application of new technologies to English teaching, and aspects of classroom teaching as well as issues facing ELT such as inclusion and diversity, sustainability and politics.

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This is the first in a series of articles which presents extracts from the British Council publication, ‘Innovations in the continuing professional development of English language teachers’. In this interesting overview, the editor, David Hayes, looks at how we might define the terms 'innovation' and 'continuing professional development'.
 

This webinar explores what trainers can do to make sure teacher development, whether face-to-face or online, can keep on sparking inspiration and enabling appropriate, practical change. Five principles are suggested which CPD providers can bear in mind to ensure their sessions are relevant, understandable, retrievable, sustainable, productive and always respectful of the participants.

This is the second in a series of articles which presents extracts from the British Council publication, ‘Innovations in the continuing professional development of English language teachers’. Here, the authors discuss who the stakeholders in continuing professional development might be and who is responsible for CPD.

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