Research and contributing to the profession

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Edited by Janet Enever

The ELLiE study provides a detailed insight of the policy and implementation processes for early foreign language learning programmes in Europe, giving a rich description of learner experiences and contexts for learning. Evidence is drawn from over 1,400 children, their schools, teachers and families in seven country contexts, exploring how early FLL is currently taking shape in Europe. The scale and longitudinal design of the study is likely to make many of the findings also highly relevant to other similar contexts.

Alan Dobson, Marìa Dolores Pérez Murillo, Richard Johnstone

This report presents the findings of an independent three-year investigation into the Ministry of Education/British Council Bilingual Schools project in Spain. Bilingual English/Spanish education is one of the most exciting innovations in the current education scene, with over 200,000 young students in Spain studying a bilingual curriculum from the age of 3, either in British Council project schools or in regional government versions of the project based on this original model.

Compiled by Euromonitor International for the British Council

This fascinating study focuses on five countries: Cameroon, Nigeria, Rwanda, Bangladesh and Pakistan. What advantages can the English language bring to individuals and societies?

Global demand for English is continuing to grow. Governments increasingly recognise the importance of English to their economies and societies, and individuals see English as a tool that can help them to fulfil their personal aspirations. However, there are complex issues and challenges associated with this scenario.

English Next was commissioned by the British Council and written by researcher David Graddol. Published in 2006, it builds on the analysis given in a report written by David Graddol for the British Council in 1997 called 'The Future of English?'. It explores some trends in the use of English worldwide and its changing relationships with other languages. The book does not attempt to provide a complete ‘state of the art’ account of global English. It outlines developments which seem to be driving changes to the international and national status of the English language.

This handbook has one simple purpose. That is, to provide some practical suggestions for language teachers. It may be that you are thinking about setting up an association or that you have already started an association and would like more ideas on certain aspects. The suggestions which are presented here are all based on the practical experience of teachers in many parts of the world.

This book is about the English language in the 21st century: about who will speak it and for what purposes. It is a practical briefing document, written for educationists, politicians, managers - any decision maker or planning team with a professional interest in the development of English worldwide.

English Next India was commissioned by the British Council and aims to contribute to the development of English language teaching and learning in India.

In this fascinating and very readable paper on English and development, Hywel Coleman looks at questions such as the role of English in employability, in international mobility, in accessing information, and English as an impartial language.

The British Council and EAQUALS have joined together to create a core curriculum inventory for the English language based around key language points for each level, including grammar, vocabulary, discourse markers and functions. This booklet is of interest to anyone involved in curriculum development.

This publication constitutes the edited proceedings of the 6th International Language & Development Conference, held in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, in October 2003. The conference, which took as its theme ‘Linguistic Challenges to National Development & International Cooperation’, was co-hosted by the Ministry of Higher & Specialised Secondary Education, Republic of Uzbekistan, and by the British Council Uzbekistan.

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In this webinar we discuss teacher-research (TR), providing practical examples from our experiences of guiding teachers in different settings. We show how TR moves from identification of an important issue to formulation of research questions, to clarification of relevant research methods and reflection on the information gained.

Philida Schellekens presents findings from the Cambridge ESOL sponsored research she carried out into first and second language acquisition with a specific focus on reading. Spring 2011.

Edited by Hamish McIlwraith

This collection of research papers is an outcome of two Regional Hornby Schools hosted by the British Council in Abuja, Nigeria in 2014 and 2015. They cover a range of topics concerning English as a Medium of Instruction (EMI) in relation to national language-in-education policies in a number of countries in Sub-Saharan Africa including Ethiopia, Rwanda and Nigeria.

Compiled by Euromonitor International for the British Council

This fascinating study focuses on five countries: Cameroon, Nigeria, Rwanda, Bangladesh and Pakistan. What advantages can the English language bring to individuals and societies?

A custom report compiled by Euromonitor International for the British Council

The British Council commissioned Euromonitor International to best map quantitative evidence of English language against the importance it imparts to individuals and countries. The countries researched are Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia, Lebanon, Egypt, Jordan, Iraq and Yemen. 

In this fascinating and very readable paper on English and development, Hywel Coleman looks at questions such as the role of English in employability, in international mobility, in accessing information, and English as an impartial language.

Hywel Coleman

This publication examines the language situations in eight West African nations – Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea, Mali, Mauritania, Senegal and Togo. It describes the roles that English plays, ways in which English is taught, who teaches it, and how learners and their teachers perceive the language.

This book is about the English language in the 21st century: about who will speak it and for what purposes. It is a practical briefing document, written for educationists, politicians, managers - any decision maker or planning team with a professional interest in the development of English worldwide.

Edited by Ben Gray & Mark Krzanowski

An edited collection of the papers presented at the ELT Conference with the same title in Khartoum, Sudan, March 2010. The conference highlighted the fact that demand from both the public and private sectors for graduates with good English skills is now at an unprecedented level and that the current provision of ELT at university level is in urgent need of reform. The papers focused on the key issues regarding ELT – namely curriculum reform, teacher training, language testing, using new technologies and engaging the private sector.

Michael Carrier talks about the work of TIRF (The International Research Foundation for English Language Education). June 2012, London.

This collection of 20 essays is the first of a number of initiatives under the British Council Language Rich Europe project, a two and a half year initiative to explore language policy and practice, facilitate knowledge sharing, and promote multilingualism across Europe in partnership with the European Commission, EUNIC (European National Institutes of Culture) and around 30 further partner institutions. 

Kathryn Board and Teresa Tinsley present the Language Trends Survey, which is the only school-focussed, subject-specific research exercise of its kind. November 2013, London. 

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