Michael Rundell

Preview 1: The confusion around 'good grammar'

Preview 2: Who's right: Humpty Dumpty or Juliet?

Preview 2: Who's right: Humpty Dumpty or Juliet?

Video 1 - What do we mean by good grammar?

Video 1 - What do we mean by good grammar?

Video 2 - Common prescriptive mistakes, part 1

Video 2 - Common prescriptive mistakes, part 1

Video 3 - Common prescriptive mistakes, part 2

Video 3 - Common prescriptive mistakes, part 2

Video 4 - Changing norms

Video 4 - Changing norms

Video 5 - Which came first: language or grammar?

Video 5 - Which came first: language or grammar?

Video 6 - Why and how language changes

Video 6 - Why and how language changes

Video 7 - Reconciling prescriptive and descriptive approaches to grammar

Video 7 - Reconciling prescriptive and descriptive approaches to grammar

Teaching the enjoyment of language

Teaching the enjoyment of language

Downloadable resources

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About this training session / session notes

Michael Rundell looks at who makes the rules about what makes language 'correct'? Is there one 'Standard English' which we all have to follow, or can we bend and break linguistic rules over time? This presentation gives an alternative (but equally rigorous) view of learning about language. It also looks at how we reconcile a descriptive, evidence-based approach to analysing language (which is fundamental to corpus linguistics) with learners' aspirations to achieve accuracy and fluency in another language.

Gain a clearer understanding of what is meant by 'rules' in the context of language and language teaching and learn more about why languages change and how this happens.

Who is this session for?

All English language teachers - EFL, ESOL, EAL - from newly qualified to experienced.

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About this training session / session notes

About the speaker

Michael Rundell has been in the dictionary business since 1980. He is co-author of the Oxford Guide to Practical Lexicography. He has been working with language corpora for 30 years, and is deeply involved in the new lexicographic revolution - the migration of reference resources from print to digital media.

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About the speaker

Before you watch

  1.  What is your opinion: Are there any aspects of language use which you dislike or disapprove of? Why do you object to these aspects? Is your objection rational and well-founded, or is it based on something else?
  2. Read these blog entries:

    To what extent do you agree with these ideas?

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Before you watch

Join the discussion

Join the discussion!

Discuss these questions with your peer teachers, if you can:

  1. Is there a right and a wrong way to speak and write in English?
  2. Should we help learners to use 'non-standard' English, such as the language they might find in songs, for example? If so, how? If not, why not?

Remember to log in and share your ideas with us by using the comments section below.

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