This British Council and the English-Speaking Union's English Language Council lecture focuses on the language of science and how to make science more publicly accessible.

Video 1 - The Edge of the Sky

Video 2 - The typical language of science

Video 2 - The typical language of science

Video 3 - Can scientific language be `translated´ into easier language?

Video 3 - Can scientific language be `translated´ into easier language?

Video 4 - Big ideas with small language

Video 4 - Big ideas with small language

Video 5 - Explaining dark matter only using the 1000 most common words in English

Video 5 - Explaining dark matter only using the 1000 most common words in English

Question 1

Question 1

Question 2

Question 2

Question 3

Question 3

Question 4

Question 4

Question 5

Question 5

Question 6

Question 6

Question 7

Question 7

The evening began with an inspiring talk by astrophysicist at Imperial College London, Dr Roberto Trotta. His book, 'The Edge of the Sky', asks all the most puzzling questions about our universe, written using only the most common thousand words in the English language.

This was followed by a debate about the use of English to communicate about science. The discussion was chaired by presenter of BBC Radio 4's science weekly 'Material World', Quentin Cooper (described by The Times as 'the world's most enthusiastic man'). Dr Roberto Trotta was joined on the panel by Aarathi Prasad, television and radio writer and presenter with a PhD in Molecular Genetics from Imperial College and George Zarkadakis, science writer, playwright and novelist with a PhD in Artificial Intelligence.

Read Dr Trotta's blog post 'Can the universe be described in simple English?'

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